Japanese Rose

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Japanese Rose (Rosa rugosa), also known in horticultural circles as simply ‘rugosa’, has a similar appearance to native dog rose. It arrived in the UK in 1796 but was first recorded in the wild in 1927 due to escape from horticulture.

WARNING

Japanese rose is listed under Schedule 9 to the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 with respect to England and Wales. As such, it is an offence to plant or otherwise allow this species to grow in the wild.

It is recommended that this plant is controlled or eradicated, and you have a duty of care to prevent its spread from your property. You must handle and dispose of the plant in accordance with strict guidelines and legislation. Contact us, we can help.

Japanese Rose Control, Survey & Treatment Specialist

Japanese Knotweed Ltd are experienced contractors in the surveying and remediation of invasive non-native plant species. We will survey a site and establish the best method and price for control or eradication in accordance with the client’s requirements and any change of site use plans. Works are expertly undertaken by trained and certified operational staff, with all works fully recorded. By contacting us you benefit from:

If you suspect you have an invasive non-native species but are unsure, please send photos of the plant to ident@knotweed.co.uk for free identification.



Japanese Rose Identification

Japanese Rose berries
Japanese Rose berries
Japanese Rose
Japanese Rose flower
Japanese Rose
Japanese Rose growth

About - Japanese Rose

Japanese rose suckers freely and forms dense, wide-reaching thickets that can out-compete native species. It’s commonly grown in gardens and amenity planting, such as in parks and around retail centres. The flowers are white to pink and the resulting hips are large and orange or red. The elliptically shaped leaves are alternate and of a leathery texture.
It typically spreads by escaping from gardens or from material thrown out from gardens. Vegetative spread is the main form of propagation and is either root-borne or stolon-borne suckers. The hips are attractive to birds and animals which can facilitate dispersal of the seeds. Its distribution in the wild is increasing. Plants are easily identifiable from their showy purplish-pink flowers. It particularly causes problems in dune habitats and along coastal grasslands. It can form dense stands, potentially at the expense of ecologically important native plants. Key features include:


Dangers - Japanese Rose

The effects of Rosa rugosa on native flora and fauna are generally negative by reducing the number of native species present at the invaded sites. Rosa rugosa displaces the natural flora of beach and dune vegetation affecting both common and rare species.

Typical dune species like Arenaria serpyllifolia, Empetrum nigrum, Festuca rubra ssp. arenaria, Galium mollugo, Poa pratensis ssp. subcaerulea, Veronica arvensis, Viola tricolor as well as mosses and lichens decline. The strong reduction of the species diversity is caused by the shading effect of Rosa rugosa.

When the local plant life is displaced the animal species that depend on these plants are also threatened (such as butterflies that lay the eggs only on certain seashore plants). Moreover, it was shown that the biological invasion of Rosa rugosafacilitates other non-native species probably in a self-preventing system of positive feedback circles.


Japanese Rose UK

Japanese rose is widely distributed throughout Scotland, Wales and England, but less so in Ireland. In the UK it occurs in hedgerows, road verges, rough and waste ground and more frequently by the sea in sand dunes, shingle and cliffs. Occasionally, it forms hybrids with native species.

Japanese Rose

NB: If no Japanese Rose is found on the property or within 7m of the property (including neighbouring properties) a charge of £140 plus VAT will apply.
*If the area to be surveyed is greater than 1 acre we reserve the right to apply a charge to carry out the survey. For the Isle of Man or Isle of Wight charges may apply, price on request.

Get in Touch

We want you to know exactly how our service works and why we need your contact details. Please state that you have read and agreed to these terms and conditions before you continue.
Form by ChronoForms - ChronoEngine.com